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6

What is the site policy for editing of answers? This is part of Stack Exchange's design... anyone can edit your posts if they think the edits will improve it. The policy is outlined in the Help Center, under help/editing... quoting from the Help Center link... Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it. Common ...


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There are a couple of great answers here that speak more generally. I will give a very specific answer as to why I would roll back these edits. In your edit, you removed a key piece of information, namely that you used a continuity tester. Further, in your comments you claim to use a professional tester. As a continuity tester is not a professional cable ...


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Why did a moderator ask me to reword the question to be on topic, then rollback the edits that were asked for? I am wholly confused about the intention. The "on hold" system was applied and used effectively. Let's be clear: I did not ask you to reword the question, I said "SuperUser is the right place to ask this question". You promptly took my advice and ...


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Even if the edits did not put the question on topic, were they invalid edits? There is no "rewording" of home networking that can ever make it on topic. You admit with the original post that it was "home wiring". That is absolutely beyond scope here. In short, what has been said cannot be un-said; your edit didn't rework anything, but removed a relevant ...


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Substantial edits (those which change the basic meaning/intent) are generally frowned upon. In this particular case, post another answer and include details of why you think the accepted answer is incorrect. "Accepted" simply means the OP feels it helped/answered their question; It does not imply "correct". Also, there are badges for (I forget the wording) ...


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If the stylistic modification don't really improve your answer, or sometimes corrupt the way you exactly wanted to phrase it, I suggest to simply roll back to your previous version. Try to be as objective and positive as possible in this analysis. If this attempt to improve your writing is learning you something, try to keep it. Someone else might also ...


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Unfortunately, these things happen. If you think the original question and your answer really are worth preserving, you can consider posting the question and answering it yourself. I don't think there's any other solution, there's no way to split the original question as if it was posted by the original poster.


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Let's start with what is good: The suggested edit attempts to reword so the post is more clear The bad: The edit changes the post from "what qos testing standards" to "what qos tools or methodologies are there?" without consulting the author regarding the changes he made. This falls into the category of: [the edit] deviates from the original intent of ...


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