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The help page states that questions on

design or theory of protocols used to operate a network (e.g. IP, TCP, routing protocols, STP, etc);

however when I tried to ask about how to analyze and benchmark an academic network layer protocol, my question got closed.

Now I am puzzled whether

  • none of the stackexchange sites fit to this topic, although it clearly seems to be a thing in anonymous networking
  • how the engineer part in network engineering is to be interpreted, because if it's just about using things that already exist, where's the engineering?

How to benchmark and analyze a network protocol prototype?

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Remember that "Network Engineering Stack Exchange is for asking questions about professionally managed networks in a business environment." Notice that the example protocols are actual, real protocols used in business, and they are actually used to operate networks in business.

Your protocol is an experimental protocol for which there are no published standards, nobody here knows anything about it, and enterprise-grade network equipment does not support it.

SE sites are often confused with help sites, but they are not. The SE concept is that if you have a questions, it is likely that others have the same question, so SE created subject archives for such questions and answers, but the questions must be on-topic nd specific enough to get specific answers.

none of the stackexchange sites fit to this topic, although it clearly seems to be a thing in anonymous networking

Not all questions have an SE site that fits.

how the engineer part in network engineering is to be interpreted, because if it's just about using things that already exist, where's the engineering?

It is about engineering the network, not building new devices or protocols (more of an IEEE engineering thing where they have ethernet, token ring, Wi-Fi, etc.). The engineering is creating a network topology with the proper enterprise-grade network devices and configuring those to get the desired result. If the devices do not support your protocol because it has not been standardized, how does that fit?

Also, notice that all "education, certification, or homework" questions are explicitly off-topic here. Your protocol could fall into that category, and none of us here know anything about it. For TCP, we can refer to the RFCs covering it and see the algorithms used for it.

One big problem you have it that IPv6 packets are not allowed to be extended in-flight, but that is exactly what you are doing. IPv6 is a protocol used in business, and you seem to be breaking it. There is a specific model for extending IPv6 (extension headers) and you are not following that model. None of that would be used in business, which needs consistent, vetted protocols.

Your protocol falls into the same category as things like Skype that are proprietary and are simply black boxes about which we cannot answer questions because we have no information on the specifics of the protocol.

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  • The IPv6 packets are not 'intended in flight', as you truely don't know enough about the protocol. Thing is that you actually don't need to know anything about the protocol itself as the question if on how to benchmark network protocols. Does you answer mean that if I remove the specification of which protocol we use from the question, the question would magically fit since it can be answered for well-established network protocols, as well? And, if you only allow things that already exist to be discussed, doesn't this also imply that you encourage to have no real progress?
    – kaiya
    Jun 20 at 15:11
  • Say I wanted to ask about Walking Onions, would that also be off-topic here because 99% of people won't use that protocol, anyway?
    – kaiya
    Jun 20 at 15:11
  • How to benchmark a protocol depends on the details of the protocol. For example, benchmarking UDP and TCP are two very different things. In any case your protocol is not used in a business network, the subject about the NE site. Walking onions is off-topic as an overlay network. What is on-topic for NE are protocols at or below OSI layer-4. You do not seem to get the part where NE is for business environments. We focus on the infrastructure is used in a business network. Even something as ubiquitous as HTTP is off-topic for NE.
    – Ron Maupin Mod
    Jun 20 at 15:23
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    Now you're ambiguous again. The protocol is at layer 3 which is below layer 4 and thus on-topic. Sure, it is not used in a business network, but what yo' re basically saying that you only support questions regarding full-developed products, so it's only about using, not engineering. I don't get how overlay networks are off-topic, they could and are used in business environments, as well. You do not seem to get that a question's content is not always related to the context, in which it came up. This seems arbitrary to me.
    – kaiya
    Jun 21 at 6:55
  • "I don't get how overlay networks are off-topic, they could and are used in business environments, as well." No, they are not. "so it's only about using, not engineering." I think you are confusing engineering with inventing. There is a lot of architecting and engineering in putting together a business network, just like there is for a building that uses pre-built studs, pipes, glass, shingles, wires, etc. The engineering is how to put it all together and configure it to work.
    – Ron Maupin Mod
    Jun 21 at 10:27
  • @kaiya, in any case, your original question has not received any reopen votes, and there has been no support here. It seems the community has no interest in your question, and it will simply languish in this community with no answer. NE is for business networks, not academic endeavors. The community was formed by network engineers to ask and answer questions relevant to their jobs in business networks.
    – Ron Maupin Mod
    Jun 21 at 10:32

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