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I have a question about my Network Engineering Stack Exchange post: Strange traceroute behavior when using iptables/nat to redirect an IP

I had previously posted this question under Server Fault, after conducting an extensive online search, but did not receive any replies at all, leading me to believe that Network Engineering might be a better location, as this is ultimately about routing and how to best combine them in an unusual scenario so packets are routed in an expected and desirable manner.

One of the main reasons I chose to post my question in Network Engineering was the prospect of getting insight and advise from seasoned professionals who would likely know a lot more about this, or what other approaches might be worth considering.

This is one of the main reasons I truly believe my question deserves a chance, that it should be opened up and if people really believe that it doesn't belong, than it could be voted to be closed, which is something I would be able to fully respect.

Thank you humbly for your time.

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  • You are lucky. My question was closed without being pointed to the question checklist by moderators who didn't understand my question (ESL moderators unfortunately). – fabspro Nov 23 '19 at 23:09
  • @fabspro, every SE site has a tour and a help center that includes a What topics can I ask about here? page, and you are expected to be familiar with those before posting on the site. Also, the box that appears when your question is closed has a direct link to the page about what you can ask. All the information has been handed to you, so your comment is disingenuous. – Ron Maupin Jun 28 at 21:00
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I truly believe that that you're being unnecessarily restrictive here. This at it's core if about how packets should be routed, regardless of the software being used

And you refuse to accept the finding of the community you are demanding answer your question. We chose to limit the scope of questions for very good reasons. First and foremost, there are existing exchanges specific to server based networking questions. By allowing your question, and questions like it, this community would have to have extensive knowledge of every version of every distribution that has ever existed. (of Linux, BSD, Windows, etc.)

Ron, are you saying that highly experienced network engineers would have not have any advanced knowledge of iptables or similar NAT and routing systems?

Yes. That's exactly what we're saying. While many of us will be aware of these tools, they are not something we work with everyday. (or even every year) I am aware of the command, and know how to read manpages, how-to's, and sift through Google searches -- many of which lead back to SF and SU, btw -- but it's not something I use regularly.

With respect, I don't see anyone else from the community interacting here, only yourself

Fair enough. NE is not that large as far as SE goes. (one more reason to not ask Linux questions here.) The vast majority of it's users don't pay any attention at all to meta. [I only look here a few times a year.] Mostly because it's filled with this sort of whining from new users that are 150% certain we should answer their question... because it's "networking" -- and no other exchange has answered it.

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As I explained in my comment You really have not provided enough information to troubleshoot the network. At the very least, we need a good network description or diagram, the network device models, and the network device configurations, and you have not provided any of that. Speculation and guessing are off-topic, so we need details.

I have also pointed you to the Network Engineering Question Checklist for guidance on what to include in the question.

We cannot help you with the host/server configurations (iptables, etc.). We can certainly help with any on-topic (enterprise-grade) network device configurations, but we need some specific information about those. You can obfuscate any passwords and public addresses contained in your network device configurations, but we really need to see those to determine where the configurations may be incorrect.

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  • I have provided information about all the involved systems, what more exactly is needed? And please stop trying to make this about host/server configurations, as that really is unfair to label it that way when the core matter is of routing and address translation, which is a networking matter. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 18:17
  • What is your router model? Are there any switches? How are the network devices connected? What are the network device configurations? Etc. That is what I have been asking for. You have only included some iptables configurations from a host or server, but that is off-topic. We can help you with the configurations of on-topic network devices. Host/server configurations (even for networks) are handled on other SE site, e.g. Server Fault, Unix & Linux, etc. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 18:20
  • @gordonfish, the checklist has links to some questions that give you examples of what we need. Something like this question, where a diagram and network device models and configurations are included. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 18:24
  • I honestly feel that you are missing my entire point. My scenario is about routing within one particular system, the Linux server, and you said previously that routing and NAT were on-topic, so I honestly do not see what the problem is. What brand the router is really doesn't matter in this case. The traceroute works fine and unobstructed when performed directly from either the Windows or Linux servers, it's just when the address translation enters into the mix that the hop responses are not being routed correctly. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 18:25
  • "My scenario is about routing within one particular system, the Linux server..." And I have repeatedly explained that host/server configurations are off-topic here. We can help you with the network devices (routers, switches, etc.) that are on-topic here (enterprise-grade, meaning for business and the manufacturer offers optional, paid support for the device). What happens inside a host or server is off-topic. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 18:28
  • I truly believe that that you're being unnecessarily restrictive here. This at it's core if about how packets should be routed, regardless of the software being used. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 18:31
  • That is what the community decided when this site was created to get the network engineering questions separated from Server Fault. The network engineers did not want to wade through all the host/server configuration questions to get to the network engineering questions. What goes on inside your host/server is what Server Fault does, and what happens out on the network with enterprise-grade network equipment is what we do on Network Engineering. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 18:34
  • With respect, I don't see anyone else from the community interacting here, only yourself. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 18:35
  • It is the weekend. Others will contribute over time. Also, Monday is a holiday in the U.S. so it may be longer. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 18:44
  • I just wanted to state that one of the main reasons that I posted this here (after posting to Server Fault previously) was to get responses from more experienced people. Therefore I really believe people of this community should have a chance to answer this question and vote to close it if they feel it really doesn't belong, not the other way around. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 19:03
  • The people experienced in iptables and other host/server configurations are on Server Fault, not Network Engineering. Network engineering does not involve what happens inside a host/server, but what happens on the network in the network devices. That is the specific reason for the split from Server Fault in the first place. It used to be that all network and host/server questions were asked and answered there, but the network engineers wanted to get away from the host/server stuff to focus on network engineering. Also, it looks like you got an answer on Server Fault. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 19:07
  • @gordonfish, by the way, cross-posting the same question on multiple SE sites is not allowed, and it can get all your cross-posted questions closed for cross-posting on all the sites asked. You pick one site to ask the question and delete it from the other sites. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 19:09
  • Ron, are you saying that highly experienced network engineers would have not have any advanced knowledge of iptables or similar NAT and routing systems? I believe a great many people would not agree with that. That is the main point here, seeking knowledge that people in the other places might not have. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 19:14
  • I have been a network engineer for over 30 years, and I have had no occasion to configure iptables; it is just not part of my job. That is up to the server guys in the company. They do not mess with the network (they do not have the rights), and I do not mess with hosts/server (I do not have the rights). In any case, you seem to have an answer on Server Fault. Sometimes it takes a few days or weeks to get an answer. – Ron Maupin Nov 10 '19 at 19:17
  • Just because you haven't used iptables doesn't mean many others of this community haven't. – gordonfish Nov 10 '19 at 19:21

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